General Baking

General Baking

With Robin Hood®, baking can be as easy as it is delicious. Feel confident in the kitchen with these tips and tricks that’ll help your baking turn out looking great and tasting even better.

Softening Butter

Softening Butter
It’s best to let butter soften at room temperature, but in a pinch you can use the microwave. Check every 10 seconds to see if it is soft.

Measuring Flour

Measuring Flour
Flour straight from the bag may be compacted. To loosen it up, scoop it out of the bag with another container or spoon before pouring it into your measuring cup. This will help you get a more accurate measurement. Level it off with a knife to make sure you have just the right amount.

Softening Brown Sugar

Softening Brown Sugar
Hardened brown sugar is easy to soften. Simply place a piece of bread in a container with your sugar overnight. The moisture from the bread will make it nice and soft by the next day.

Testing Baked Goods

Testing Baked Goods
No two ovens are quite the same, so make sure to test your baked goods for doneness 5 to 10 minutes before the end of the recommended baking time.

Melting Chocolate

Melting Chocolate
Make sure your bowl or pot is completely dry before melting chocolate to keep it from seizing.

Measuring Shortening or Butter

Measuring Shortening or Butter
If your recipe calls for ½ cup (125 mL) of shortening or butter, fill your liquid measuring cup with ½ cup (125 mL) of water. Then add your shortening or butter until the water line reaches 1 cup (250 mL).

Substituting Buttermilk

Substituting Buttermilk
Out of buttermilk? Make your own substitute in a pinch. To replace 1 cup (250 mL) of buttermilk, simply add ¼ cup (50 mL) of white vinegar or lemon juice to a measuring cup. Then fill it up to the 1-cup (250 mL) line with Carnation® Evaporated Milk. Or, add 1 tbsp (15 mL) of white vinegar or lemon juice to a measuring cup. Then fill it up to the 1-cup (250 mL) line with regular milk. Let it sit for 5 minutes. Stir again before using.

Egg Whites: Soft Peaks Definition

Egg Whites: Soft Peaks Definition
You’ve reached soft peaks when you can pull out the beater, leaving a peak that falls over.

Egg Whites: Firm Peaks Definition

Egg Whites: Firm Peaks Definition
You’ve reached firm peaks when you can pull out the beater, leaving a peak that stands up tall.

Whipping Egg Whites

Whipping Egg Whites
Make sure there is no trace of egg yolk or grease in your bowl before adding your egg whites. This can stop them from whipping.

Tempering Eggs

Tempering Eggs
When you need to add eggs into something hot, try tempering them. This means stirring in a very small amount of the hot mixture into the eggs so the eggs warm up. Then stir the warmed egg mixture into the rest of the hot mixture.

Whipped Cream

Whipped Cream
When whipping cream, don’t add your sugar until your cream is whipped to soft peaks.

Looking for more tips or baking advice? Ask the Robin Hood Community for help!

The community is the place for bakers to get together, talk about baking successes, ask questions and share pictures of their latest treats.